Thankful for Autistics

Happy Thanksgiving to all those who celebrate this week. I hope your holiday is safe, healthy, rewarding, and warm. This Thanksgiving I’m especially thankful for family, friends, and that my husband has had a stable income throughout the pandemic. I’m also thankful for Autistic writers who are -open to sharing their personal experiences -willing to…

Autism Interview #148: Khali Raymond on Writing and Autism Advocacy

Khali Raymond is a writer and musician from Newark, New Jersey. He could read at the age of two and his work ethic and love for words has led to a prolific writing career (with 163 books to date). Khali’s love for his city and community is extremely strong and is a primary influence for his work. This week Khali discussed his writing life, the stereotypes he encounters, and the direction of autism advocacy.

Autism Interview #147: Bernard Grant on Writing and Autism Acceptance

Bernard Grant’s writing has appeared in Crab Orchard Review, New Delta Review, The South Carolina Review, Third Coast, and Craft, among other online and print publications. Bernard serves as an Associate Fiction Editor of Tahoma Literary Review and holds an MFA from The Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University where they were awarded the Carol Houck Smith Graduate Scholarship. They have also received scholarships to The Anderson Center, Sundress Academy for the Arts, and Fishtrap: Writing and the West, as well as fellowships from Vermont Studio Center, Jack Straw Cultural Center, Mineral School, and The University of Cincinnati, where they are a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature and Creative Writing, and are at work on a novel-in-stories that focuses on a mixed-raced family and features autistic characters. Bernard is also working on essays on autism and American racism, which they plan to collect and title Unmasking. This week Bernard discussed his life as an Autistic author and ways society can work towards autism acceptance.

Autism Interview #143: Tracey Cohen on Her ‘Up Close and Personal’ New Book

Photo credit: Martin Wooledge Photography

Tracey Cohen is an experienced ultrarunner, author, and speaker, and has competed in thousands of races around the world. She was featured on this blog last year discussing some of her experiences growing up undiagnosed, her current advocacy work, and her love of running. Tracey was diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome at the age of 39 and speaks regularly about autism to school groups and at conferences. She is the author of several books, including Six-Word Lessons on Female Asperger Syndrome, Six-Word Lessons on the Sport of Running, and the recently-released My Life on the Autism Spectrum: Misunderstandings, Insight & Growth. This week she shared how she’s been surviving the pandemic and the unique, personal nature of her new book.

Neurodiversity 101 Webinar

Neurodiversity 101: Tips for promoting autism acceptance and raising more confident and capable Autistic children Full Transcript Below Hi Everyone, my name is Jenna Gensic, and I’m the founder of LearnFromAutistics.com, a website which aims to connect parents and caregivers with Autistic voices and expertise and helps promote Autistic writing and Autistic-endorsed resources. I regularly…

Accepting Your Autism: A How-to Comprehensive Guide by Kerrin Maclean

The guide below is written by Kerrin Maclean (see her interview from last week here) and originally published on her blog. It is reprinted here with her permission. Kerrin Maclean is an Autism advocate from New Zealand. She vlogs at Aspie Answers, spreading awareness of Autism and invites viewers to witness the everyday life of an ‘Aspie.’ Maclean is also the author of Life of an Aspie and blogs at Life of an Aspie.

Autistic Writers on the Topic of Love

Let’s expel some myths about autism and dating/sexuality this Valentine’s Day! As always, the best way to do this is to see what people on the spectrum are saying about the topic. Below you’ll find a variety of articles authored by #ActuallyAutistic writers who speak on the topic of dating, romance, and love on the spectrum.

Common Ableist Terms You Might Be Using

Ableism (discrimination against disabled people) is unfortunately so prevalent in society that it has pervaded everyday language. People use this language without even thinking about its origins or the problem with its widespread use. I’ve compiled a list of some of the most common ableist words/phrases in an effort to both illustrate their prevalence and raise awareness for those interested in avoiding this language (and educating others!).