Autism Interview #141: Tara Campbell on Parenting, Ableism, and Autism Advocacy

Tara L. Campbell is a speculative fiction and creative nonfiction science writer with a professional background in technology. She enjoys writing at the intersection of science, technology, and disability. Stories about overlooked or misunderstood people and concepts are key aspects in her work. This week Tara shared her experiences as an Autistic advocate and parenting…

Neurodiversity 101 Webinar

Neurodiversity 101: Tips for promoting autism acceptance and raising more confident and capable Autistic children Full Transcript Below Hi Everyone, my name is Jenna Gensic, and I’m the founder of LearnFromAutistics.com, a website which aims to connect parents and caregivers with Autistic voices and expertise and helps promote Autistic writing and Autistic-endorsed resources. I regularly…

Common Ableist Terms You Might Be Using

Ableism (discrimination against disabled people) is unfortunately so prevalent in society that it has pervaded everyday language. People use this language without even thinking about its origins or the problem with its widespread use. I’ve compiled a list of some of the most common ableist words/phrases in an effort to both illustrate their prevalence and raise awareness for those interested in avoiding this language (and educating others!).

Thankful for Autistic Sharing and What the Autistic Community is Saying About Thanksgiving and the Holidays

I’d like say that I’m grateful for the many Autistic people I’ve corresponded with who have helped me to better understand autism, raise my son with a positive autistic identity, and shape my advocacy efforts for this community. This website is a platform for autistic voices and expertise, but only because so many Autistic individuals…

A Preview–What Your Child on the Spectrum Really Needs: Advice From 12 Autistic Adults

Stories That Need To Be Told

I love listening to stories. The idea for this book came from my passion for storytelling and a special interest in the authority of personal experience. I studied the personal essay in graduate school and have continued using the transformative power of storytelling in a variety of different ways. My interest in autistic storytelling comes from living alongside my autistic brother and son.

When my son was diagnosed with autism at four, my husband and I sought the advice of every “expert” we were recommended to: doctors, therapists, psychologists, etc. But there was one problem with these professionals that left a big gap in our pursuit for the best support for our son–they weren’t autistic. I grew tired of the media stories about what I should or should not be doing as a parent of an autistic child. Avoid milk! Extra doses of vitamins! Try this really expensive supplement! Don’t eat broccoli in your first trimester! So…the broccoli reprimand I haven’t actually heard yet, but you get the idea. When I first started this project, I wanted to find out what autistic people thought of the overwhelming amount of therapy, behavioral, and diet advice out there. I soon realized this is where I should have started.

Autistic Education: Back to School Tips from Actually Autistic People

autistic education

How do we get our children pumped for a new school year? If the excitement doesn’t come naturally (or, even if it does), there is plenty parents and teachers can do to help autistic students better prepare for a return to school at the start of a new year and also maintain a healthy schedule and routine throughout the year. This article summarizes some ideas about autism and education as summarized by actually autistic individuals. If we give them the proper tools to begin a new routine and navigate a new schedule and environment, our messages of positivity, hopefulness, and excitement about the future are more likely to be embraced by our children.

Social Skills for Everyone by Erin Human

Erin Human is an Autistic artist and married mother of two who creates infographics and neurodiversity-themed designs. She sells work on Redbubble in addition to working as the Art Director for the Autistic Women & Nonbinary Network (AWN). She has created a wonderful illustrated guide on making friends and getting along with people who are different. A description of the guide is reprinted here with her permission. The full guide is also accessible in our resources section.