Autism Interview #198: Jeremiah Josey on Transitions, Cooking, and Advocacy

Jeremiah Josey is a twenty-three-year-old pastry chef from Maryland and published author of Here’s What I Want You To Know. He is a public disability advocate and has cooked alongside a wide range of successful, talented chefs, such as Chef Kwame Onwuachi, Chef Chris Scott both who have appeared on Bravo TV Top Chef, Franklyn Becker, Bravo Master’s and Paul Denamiel, Owner and Executive Chef of Le Rivage. This week Josey shared the racial justice motivation for writing his new book as well as some of his experiences with life transitions and cooking.

Autism Interview #189: Medusa on Education Transitions, Work, and Teen Life

Medusa (Lucy Alexandra Hall) is an 18-year-old from Scotland diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, depression, and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Medusa blogs at The Medusa Diaries on a variety of topics, including the fears and struggles of being newly-diagnosed and her journey coming to terms with her diagnoses. This week she shared her experience as a recent high school graduate, just beginning work and education transitions.

Autism Interview #160, Part One: Marcelle Ciampi on Core Inclusion in the Workplace and School

Image source: The Art of Autism

 Marcelle Ciampi M.Ed. (aka Samantha Craft), a respected Autistic author and worldwide advocate, is best known for her writings found in the well-received book Everyday Aspergers. She serves as the Ambassador and Senior Manager of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion at Ultranauts Inc., an engineering firm with a neurodiversity-hiring initiative, where Ciampi is credited for developing an innovative universal design approach for inclusion. She also provides keynotes, workshops, corporate training, consulting, and life coaching for Spectrum Suite. In Part One of her two-part interview, Ciampi discussed how Ultranauts is serving as a model of workplace inclusion and offers advice for advocating for inclusion in the educational setting as well.  

Autism Interview #158: Madison Lessard on College Life

Madison Lessard is a college student from New Hampshire pursuing a degree in theology and history. She enjoys writing YA contemporary fiction about road trips, hockey, and disabled characters. She has a blog about her personal experiences as an Autistic college student. This week she shared her transition to college life and how she advocates for herself as an Autistic college student living on campus.

Autism Interview #112 Part 1: Maxine Share on Diagnosis and Education

Maxine Share is a Canadian writer, advocate, workshop creator, and presenter working hard to try to change understanding so that we can change the actions of those working and living with people on the spectrum. In Part One of her two-part interview, she shared her diagnosis story, discussed her work as an autism consultant, and offered recommendations for supporting autistic children in the classroom.

What Your Child on the Spectrum Really Needs: Advice From 12 Autistic Adults Preview

Interview with Contributor Ben Kartje

Interview with What Your Child Really Needs Contributor Ben Kartje

I recently had the opportunity to sit down with Ben Kartje, a contributor to What Your Child on the Spectrum Really Needs: Advice From 12 Autistic Adults. He talked about his interest in the project, previewed some of his advice, and discussed his hopes for readers. What Your Child Really on the Spectrum Really Needs is now available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and several online retailers in paperback form. It will also be available as an e-book soon. The video transcript can be found below.

Autistic Education: Back to School Tips from Actually Autistic People

autistic education

How do we get our children pumped for a new school year? If the excitement doesn’t come naturally (or, even if it does), there is plenty parents and teachers can do to help autistic students better prepare for a return to school at the start of a new year and also maintain a healthy schedule and routine throughout the year. This article summarizes some ideas about autism and education as summarized by actually autistic individuals. If we give them the proper tools to begin a new routine and navigate a new schedule and environment, our messages of positivity, hopefulness, and excitement about the future are more likely to be embraced by our children.